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Wilson Mar

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Platform as a Service (PaaS)

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Overview

This article describes how to bring up servers within Digital Ocean a cloud-based virtual private server (VPS) to host a server (Jenkins).

I want you to feel confident that you’ve mastered this skill. That’s why this takes a hands-on approach where you type in commands and we explain the responses and possible troubleshooting. This is a “deep dive” because all details are presented.

Like a good music DJ, I’ve carefully arranged the presentation of concepts into a sequence for easy learning, so you don’t have to spend as much time as me making sense of the flood of material around this subject.

Sentences that begin with PROTIP are a high point of this website to point out wisdom and advice from experience. NOTE point out observations that many miss. Search for them if you only want “TL;DR” (Too Long Didn’t Read) highlights.

Stuck? Contact me and I or one of my friends will help you.

Account Sign-up

  1. Sign up for an account at
    DigitalOcean.com

  2. Provide a credit card or Paypal account enough for a $5 droplet.

    Define SSH Keys

  3. Open a Terminal shell window to a folder where you generate SSH key pair:

    cd ~/.ssh

    See https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-use-ssh-keys-with-digitalocean-droplets

    ssh-keygen -t rsa

  4. Save the file as “do_s” or another file of your choosing. Unlike other programs, we won’t be using the default file names on your machine.

  5. Copy the public key file into your clipboard:

    pbcopy < ~/.ssh/do_s.pub

    Alternately, use a text editor to open the file to copy, such as:

    atom ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

  6. Switch back to the Create Droplet webpage to click “New SSH Key”.

  7. Click in the box and press command+V to paste.

    Server

  8. Specify a server name.

    PROTIP: Define (in writing) a server naming convention for use by your team. Use of sequential numbers would require a tracking system.

  9. Select the location, etc.

  10. Select Droplet image.

    QUESTION: Select my own.

  11. Copy the hostname to your clipboard and paste to your notes.

    ubuntu-512mb-nyc1-01

  12. Click the green Create button.

  13. Copy the IP Address to your clipboard and paste to your notes. For example:

    192.241.155.147

  14. Click More to Access Console.

    NOTE: Each Droplet spun up is a new VPS for your personal use.

    Alternately,

    ssh root@192.241.155.147

    The first time you connect, you’ll see a message such as:

    The authenticity of host '192.241.155.147 (192.241.155.147)' can't be established.
    ECDSA key fingerprint is SHA256:sdfsdfsdfu5+Xsaf4COHb0UaRTxeoycUh4tLj1kwNQ.
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)?
    

    Type yes because this is expected behavior.

  15. Enter your password.

  16. Click API at the top menu.

    Register the app.

  17. Add image

    See https://cloud.digitalocean.com/images/snapshots

Aditionally:

  • https://www.docker.com/products/docker-toolbox
  • https://www.digitalocean.com/support
  • https://www.digitalocean.com/community

Auto Deploy to Digital Ocean

  • We should then be able to trigger a manual deployment into production by supplying a valid RC release from the list of RC tagged releases.

More on DevOps

This is one of a series on DevOps:

  1. DevOps_2.0
  2. ci-cd (Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery)
  3. User Stories for DevOps
  4. Enterprise Software)

  5. Git and GitHub vs File Archival
  6. Git Commands and Statuses
  7. Git Commit, Tag, Push
  8. Git Utilities
  9. Data Security GitHub
  10. GitHub API
  11. TFS vs. GitHub

  12. Choices for DevOps Technologies
  13. Pulumi Infrastructure as Code (IaC)
  14. Java DevOps Workflow
  15. Okta for SSO & MFA

  16. AWS DevOps (CodeCommit, CodePipeline, CodeDeploy)
  17. AWS server deployment options
  18. AWS Load Balancers

  19. Cloud services comparisons (across vendors)
  20. Cloud regions (across vendors)
  21. AWS Virtual Private Cloud

  22. Azure Cloud Onramp (Subscriptions, Portal GUI, CLI)
  23. Azure Certifications
  24. Azure Cloud

  25. Azure Cloud Powershell
  26. Bash Windows using Microsoft’s WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux)
  27. Azure KSQL (Kusto Query Language) for Azure Monitor, etc.

  28. Azure Networking
  29. Azure Storage
  30. Azure Compute
  31. Azure Monitoring

  32. Digital Ocean
  33. Cloud Foundry

  34. Packer automation to build Vagrant images
  35. Terraform multi-cloud provisioning automation
  36. Hashicorp Vault and Consul to generate and hold secrets

  37. Powershell Ecosystem
  38. Powershell on MacOS
  39. Powershell Desired System Configuration

  40. Jenkins Server Setup
  41. Jenkins Plug-ins
  42. Jenkins Freestyle jobs
  43. Jenkins2 Pipeline jobs using Groovy code in Jenkinsfile

  44. Docker (Glossary, Ecosystem, Certification)
  45. Make Makefile for Docker
  46. Docker Setup and run Bash shell script
  47. Bash coding
  48. Docker Setup
  49. Dockerize apps
  50. Docker Registry

  51. Maven on MacOSX

  52. Ansible

  53. MySQL Setup

  54. SonarQube & SonarSource static code scan

  55. API Management Microsoft
  56. API Management Amazon

  57. Scenarios for load
  58. Chaos Engineering